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Top 10 Unexplored Places On Earth No One Has Been Visit

As travel gets more affordable and popular, people rush to find the corners of the unexplored places on earth visited yet. Suddenly, every blog post is trying to reveal every exotic country’s “best-kept secrets” and “hidden gems”.

You’d think after thousands of years on earth, humans would have scoured everything, right? Well, there are still unexplored places on earth where modern humans simply can’t set foot.

Whether it’s because it’s too dangerous or because its inhabitants have declared it sacred, it turns out we cannot explore every place that we want.

So today, let’s take a look at Top 10 Unexplored Places On Earth No One Has Been There. But before we get started, why not become an archivist today by following Facebook page.

Top 10 Unexplored Places On Earth No One Has Been There

Siberian Sakha Republic

10. The Siberian Sakha Republic

Russia is so massive that it has many types of climates and people. One of these areas, Siberian Sakha Republic, is covered in permafrost and it’s probably not going to thaw anytime soon.

This makes it quite hostile for a person to be in. The Siberian Sakha Republic is larger than Argentina and almost the size of India!

While it’s not the whole region that remains untouched by humanity, a lot of it goes below -40 degrees Fahrenheit, making human survival there almost impossible.

When the region where you live is also the home to the Verkhoyansk Range, the coldest place of the Northern Hemisphere, there’s not a lot of exploring happening and that includes other animals!

Vale Do Javari

9. Vale Do Javari

This Valley is in Brazil, and also an indigenous area. Since, again, Brazil is so big, this area alone is bigger than Austria.

However, modern humans haven’t touched it. That’s not to say there aren’t humans living there, there are actually about 3,000, but they’ve not participated in modern civilization at all.

So, we don’t know anything about it. We don’t set foot there because it’s illegal. The Brazilian government banned entry.

They’d rather not tarnish their view of the world, preserving their lifestyle from above. Which, frankly, must be pretty relaxing for them. You know what they say – ignorance is bliss. And this is at number 9 in lists of unexplored places on earth.

The Mariana Trench
The Mariana Trench

8. The Mariana Trench

It’s hard to say that all of the Mariana Trench hasn’t been seen by human eyes because that’s not true. A few humans have been down there, we’ve set devices, and we’ve taken pictures of some of it.

However, it’s huge! And, technically, no human has ever stepped”foot” there because of how deep underwater it is.

The depth is about 36,070 feet and the crushing pressure from the water will make it very difficult for technology to ever build a suit strong enough for humans to walk on the ocean floor.

Gangkhar Puensum

7. Gangkhar Puensum

Gangkhar Puensum, or “white peak of the three spiritual brothers”, is the highest mountain that we know of that remains unclaimed.

It’s not that tall, standing at 7,500 meters. It’s not even in difficult terrain or a particularly harsh climate.

It’s actually for cultural reasons. In Bhutan, where it’s located, this mountain is sacred, and therefore untouchable. Since 1994, the climb has been entirely banned.

Before the bans, there were attempts, but the harsh weather held the few who attempted back.

We don’t even have proper maps of the area because mountaineering in the area is also not allowed.

If we’re to judge by history, religious beliefs don’t change often, so we may never know more about this mountain.

Kamchatka

6. Kamchatka

More Russian places. It’s a big country, okay? They have this peninsula with a bunch of active volcanoes.

Now, at least one of these is constantly active since the 90s. It’s so dangerous that the government banned entry to anyone except the military.

The area in question is on an island, so if something were to go down, the rest of the country would be fine.

However, no Russian blogger is going to godown there for kicks. See, it’s almost impossible to tell whether a volcano will erupt, so assuring the safety of anyone, even the military men who are there is impossible.

Son Doong Cave

5. Son Doong Cave

Vietnam has lots of Caves. If you visit, you can stop by a varied number of them including a Hospital cave that soldiers used during the war, a “Surprising” cave full of interesting shapes, and many more.

However, the Son Doong Cave is the largest in the world. It’s deep and large enough to hold a skyscraper! But, the five and a half-mile long cave is blocked by a 200-foot long calcite wall.

It’s one of the largest natural barriers in the world. Now, getting to the largest cave by crossing the largest wall is the stuff of epic books, but it seems like it’s too much for us right now.

You can’t go around it, you can’t go over it. Some people have suggested blowing it up, but that’s getting a little ahead of ourselves.

The cave is interesting enough to wonder, though, what kind of action we want to take to get there. It has a jungle and a river, can you imagine? It’d be like Avatar!

Chile's Wildest Landscapes

4. Chile’s Wildest Landscapes

The home of Chile’s wildest landscapes, this area hides many untouched rainforests, peaks, rivers, and lakes.

Northern Patagonia is also home to one of the largest masses of ice found outside of the polar region.

Its high elevation has helped preserve the remaining ice field that once covered all of the Argentinian and Chilean Patagonia in the Andes.

From the use of satellites, scientists have determined that some of the glaciers in Patagonia are melting faster than anywhere else in the world, receding at a rate of 21 billion tons per year.

Despite this, the frozen area is still over 1,600 square miles. A few researchers and explorers have crossed the ice field in recent years, but many of its glaciers remain largely unexplored.

Cenotes

3. Cenotes

While some Cenotes are big tourist attractions, these networks of caves, located in Mexico, are very intricate and remote.

They’re well worth checking out, at least the ones you can approach. With limestone bedrock and exposed blue groundwater, they are truly a sight to see.

However, most of them are difficult or even impossible to access. Some of them are underwater and have an eerie ancient feeling to them since many were sacrificial sites.

Some underwater Cenotes are so hard to reach, that even fish can’t get there.

Sarlacc Pit

2. Sarlacc Pit

This Canadian cave was discovered in 2018and informally named after a Star Wars monster buried in the Great Pit of Carkoon.

The name is still pending until a naming consultation can be held with First Nations in the area.

The cave is located in Provincial Park in British Columbia. For now, we only have helicopter footage of the cave, but the inside remains quite the mystery that explorers can’t wait to get a peek at.

The discoverers wished to keep the location secret to prevent environmental damage to the cave from visitors.

The Government of British Columbia also closed the area around the cave in the interests of preservation and public safety.

Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park

1. Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park

We have places this at number one in list of unexplored places on earth. This national park in Madagascar translates to the place “where one can not walk barefoot”.

They’re telling you in the name that you can’t step foot there. It’s a park covered in rock formations.

The locals have built suspended bridges and steel cables so that spectators can see the sights, and have a mini panic attack.

Walking in the park, though? That’s the stuff of champs. You can only access via a dirt road, which isn’t even open during the rainy season, six months a year.

The other six months? Well, give it a try and let us know… or just take your picture from the bridges like everyone else.

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